Tag Archives: Captain America

Quote of the Day: Ed Brubaker on superheroes

17 Dec

by Mike Hansen

From Point Blank #1 (the prelude to Sleeper) – click to make bigger:

Ed Brubaker quote

I love it when comics mix genres. Ed Brubaker’s blend of crime and superheroes in Sleeper and Incognito is a blast. His murder/revenge story in Captain America was easily the best thing about Marvel’s Civil War event a few years back. (I’m still woefully behind on new comics, but what I’ve read of his horror/crime series Fatale has been amazing so far…)

COPYRAGE: Sony screws Bob Dylan fans with ridiculously limited-edition box set

7 Jan

by Mike Hansen

Bob Dylan 50th front

Way to rub it in everyone’s faces, Sony!

U.S. copyright law tends to revolve around ensuring that Disney continues to own Mickey Mouse in perpetuity (along with Warner Brothers clinging tenaciously to Superman and Batman, Marvel to Captain America, etc.). In Europe, it seems to be all about its music superstars.

Today, Rolling Stone reported something sure to annoy 99.999999999999% of Bob Dylan fans: about 100 copies of an official 4-CD, 86-song Bob Dylan box set of 1962 outtakes (Dylan’s first year with Columbia Records, now owned by Sony Music).

“This isn’t a scheme to make money,” a Sony Music source tells Rolling Stone. “The copyright law in Europe was recently extended from 50 to 70 years for everything recorded in 1963 and beyond. With everything before that, there’s a new ‘Use It or Lose It’ provision. It basically said, ‘If you haven’t used the recordings in the first 50 years, you aren’t going to get any more.'”

Bob Dylan 50th backSo even though Sony doesn’t intend to make money from these recordings (most of which are widely available on bootleg), it wants to ensure that they don’t enter the public domain so they can be freely copied and shared. Really? Is Sony that afraid of having to compete with anyone’s ability to package, release, and distribute the material in a manner of their choosing?

Bob Dylan’s 1962 debut LP became a part of the European public domain on January 1st, meaning anybody in Europe can release the music without paying Dylan one dime. “The whole point of copyrighting this stuff is that we intend to do something with it at some point in the future,” says the source. “But it wasn’t the right time to do it right after he released Tempest. There are other things we want to do in 2013 though.”

Oh, okay: so Sony DOES intend to make money off it. LATER. So they’re lying. Classy!

I’m all for compensating artists for their work, but these are recordings that sat on the shelf for over 50 years while the artist and record company made no effort to make a penny off them. And instead of just allowing the material to become public-domain (like Dylan’s first album and, I assume, the Beatles’ earliest recordings), Sony released just *100* copies of the material to protect its copyright while ensuring that virtually 0% of Bob Dylan fans will actually (legally) hear the material. In a business where record labels routinely underpay their artists (and overpay their executives), this is simply a corporate move to hold onto property it doesn’t care about, just in case it might be worth a few dollars later. This doesn’t benefit the artist; it doesn’t benefit the consumer; and it doesn’t benefit the corporate behemoth greedily clutching the rights. What’s the point?

According to the New York Times, it looks like only Dylan fans in France and Germany can legally download this material from the artist’s website. What?

… Sony is not alone. Universal, which owns the Motown catalog, has released a series of jazz, gospel and rhythm and blues albums under the rubric “Motown Unreleased 1962,” which makes a large body of its unissued archives eligible for the European copyright extension.

Wow. If this isn’t abuse of copyright law, I don’t know what is. It’s no wonder music fans continue to use extralegal methods to acquire music. This is Exhibit A for why copyright law needs to be amended for the benefit of creators and the public, instead of for corporations that behave like mental patients.

An explanation and apology to readers

16 Oct

by Mike Hansen

After a productive first couple of months, ALL DAY COMICS has been updated in fits and starts for a while now. Why? Well, it’s all my fault. I’m the one who does all of the updating, regardless of who contributes to the site. I’d originally envisioned ADC as an Ain’t It Cool-style site about comics, with contributions from several folks supporting my schedule. For various reasons, it hasn’t quite worked out that way, so thanks for sticking with the site despite the irregular posting.

So, WHY has ADC been updated so infrequently lately? Well, the main reason is that I have less free time: after being out of comics for a decade, I’m finally doing some professional comics work again. First off, I’ve been doing freelance research work for Marvel. I’ve helped out in an unofficial capacity in the past (there are a handful of Marvel books that credit me in the Special Thanks section, most recently X-MEN: BISHOP’S CROSSING), but now I’m getting to do paid research, which is really exciting and is a great outlet for my otherwise useless nerdy comics knowledge. (Since Marvel books have a long production schedule, you won’t see my pro credits in them for a while, though.)

I’m also in the process of creating some cool comics with some amazingly talented artists, and I hope to be able to share some of that work in the next few months. I can’t say much yet, except that we think we’re creating some exciting and original work, and I can’t wait to see what everyone thinks.

In the meantime, I’ll do my best to keep ADC chugging along as best I can. I’ve got a few more things to post in the next week or two – and very soon, an amazing interview that Orion conducted down at Comic-Con.

Onward!

Friday Reading: A rare 1967 Jack Kirby story from Esquire

9 Mar

by Mike Hansen

King Kirby

'Nuff said, True Believer.

This has been on the internet before, but the best-looking color scan yet of Jack Kirby’s 3-page story “46 Hours and 36 Minutes in the Life of Jack Ruby” (from the May 1967 issue of Esquire) appeared recently on the Marvel Masterworks Fan Site message board. User Famac “destroyed” his copy of this magazine so the story could be shared with the world. (Jack Ruby, as you may know, shot and killed Lee Harvey Oswald.)

Kirby worked in a variety of genres, though by the 1960s he was best known for his unparalleled creation of the foundation of the Marvel Universe (Fantastic Four, Hulk, Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, Ant-Man, the Avengers, X-Men, etc.). This is a rare “true-life” story from Kirby’s body of work. The story (inked by Chic Stone) has been reprinted only once – in black-and-white, in The Jack Kirby Collector #2 from 1994.

Here’s page 1 – click here for the whole thing, and have a great weekend!

Kirby Esquire 1 Continue reading

R.I.P. x 3

15 Dec

by Mike Hansen

Captain America Comics #1 (March 1941). Cover ...

Captain America Comics #1 (Image via Wikipedia)

I was saddened to learn of the passings of three comics greats in the last several days: Jerry Robinson, Joe Simon, and Eduardo Barreto. All contributed in significant ways to the comics I’ve enjoyed.

The comics and outside press has been doing a fine job honoring these men. DC Comics, on the other hand, was very careful in its praise of Robinson, never actually calling him the CREATOR of any of its characters or work – despite the fact that, as far as the rest of the planet is concerned, Robinson is unquestionably the creator of the Joker, one of comics’ greatest icons. Sigh…

Let’s see if the Continue reading

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