Tag Archives: Comic book

San Diego Comic-Con 2013 pictures (part 1)

7 Aug

Photos by Orion Tippens

Captions by Mike Hansen

It’s been two weeks since Comic-Con, and I’m still finding my feet! What an amazing time. Elvin and I had lots of interest in our comic, THE BEAT DOWN! – I’ll post more pages in a few days. In the meantime, enjoy these terrific pics from my main man Orion: A whole lot of cosplay, plus one handsome gentleman…

LOOK WHAT I MADE!

LOOK WHAT I MADE!

Photo Jul 21, 6 00 15 AM

Photo Jul 21, 5 39 19 AM

Photo Jul 20, 4 58 40 AM

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My Comic-Con ticket buying experience

20 Feb

by Mike Hansen

So unlike a lot of folks’ horror stories, I had no problem buying Comic-Con tickets this year.

I got a Member ID in advance. I clicked the link in the email. I read the instructions. I watched the video. I clicked the green button and waited for the screen to reload, until the webpage loaded the waiting room. I was number 450 in line. I waited for the page to refresh every two minutes, until it allowed me to purchase tickets after about 5 minutes. I bought tickets. A few hours later, I got confirmation emails.

That’s it. Feel free to hate me now.

If it makes you feel better, I’m applying for professional status (thanks to my comics writing and freelance research work for Marvel), so hopefully you won’t have to worry about me taking a paid badge from you next year.

Start the year with a great read

1 Jan

by Mike Hansen

It’s not comics, but it applies to comics as much as text books: Here’s a fantastic, award-winning essay on copyright and piracy, and how modern technology will make books as easy to copy and share as music and movies. (Don’t fear the length: it’s a smooth, fast read.)

Here’s a taste:

Neil Gaiman thinks that releasing a free digital copy of American Gods (2001) increased sales by three hundred per cent, and he no longer fears piracy. ‘It’s people lending books. And you can’t look at that as a lost sale,’ he says. ‘What you’re actually doing is advertising. You’re reaching more people. You’re raising awareness … And I think, basically, that’s an incredibly good thing.’ But he doesn’t know. Cory Doctorow says half a million free downloads of his Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom (2003) helped the book through five physical print runs. ‘Giving away books costs me nothing, and actually makes me money,’ he says. Maybe he knows. There is a growing body of anecdotal evidence. But nobody really knows whether that kind of strategy will work for all books and all authors, or whether it will work for long.

Most comics get scanned and uploaded to the internet as soon as they’re released, but a digital screen (even a tablet) is still not preferable in most cases. Comixology and other services have developed some workarounds for the unusual size and shape of comics pages and panels, but few comics are optimized for digital viewing – at least, for now. The future’s going to be very interesting indeed…

The internet reacts to gay people in comics

29 May

by Mike Hansen

A lot of folks have piped in on this already, but here are a couple of images that I thought worth sharing:

TERRIBLE PARENTING

(Personally, I don’t have a problem with kids looking at either – kids are smart enough to know what they can handle. But this still makes a good point.)

Ty Templeton on why gayness matters in a super-heroThat’s really shoving it down our throats!  (Originally posted here.)

All Day Comic of the Day: ORC STAIN!

26 May

by Orion Tippens

Orc Stain: Volume 1

Writer, Artist, Colorist – James Stokoe

Image Comics, 2010

Collects issues 1-5 with some extras

 Orc Stain TPB cover


Here is the very reason I enjoy reading comic books: to be enveloped in an unfamiliar universe, where certain elements occasionally rip and rebuild the foundations of the imagination!

Orc Stain: Volume 1 by James Stokoe delivers a fantasy world like no other, perfected in the sequential art form.

Within lies the creator’s interpretation of the orc, familiar in too much fantasy literature as mindless, savage beasts, often in the service of a greater evil. But in the world of Orc Stain, we see a contrasting, truthful lifestyle, a more independent environment of the orc: much of it filled with otherworldly dwellings, gargantuan creatures, and dangerous vegetation. Here the resources and surroundings in orc life are complex, organized into necessity for such creatures to survive and exist. Concepts of good and evil need not apply, as purpose and necessity are more apparent to the survival of the orc inhabitants. They have savage instincts, but with a bizarre sense of logical direction that collectively evolve, which develops into a world as imaginative as futuristic sci-fi lit.

We, as readers, share in the survival of the protagonist, a one-eyed thief Orc, with a knack for hitting pressure points with his hammer. On his journey, he is eventually thrust into a grander situation, becoming the target of dominating forces and a mysterious prophecy. Along the way, discovery and treachery happen, guiding our hero in doing great and terrible things by instinct and bravery, propelling the story forward.

Orc Stain excerpt

The story elements are a perfect complement to the art. For the Continue reading

Comic Book Men

18 Feb

by Mike Hansen

Kevin Smith

Kevin Smith at somebody's else's comic book store. (Image via Wikipedia)

I liked this show.

I’d guess it’s mainly because I’m a Kevin Smith fan, and his recent Q&A/standup specials have been downright brilliant. Having worked in a comics shop, it seemed pretty accurate to me – with trying to find stupid stuff to do during the frequent downtime, the freaky customers who come in trying to make money off their junk, and the employees making fun of customers (and each other) when nobody else is around. Most comics shops are really unprofessional, and to me that’s part of their charm – I mean, who wants to hang out at, say, Walmart?

The “Pawn Stars” moments Continue reading

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